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Polgorm?

Polgorm?

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My Grt Grt Grandfather Daniel O'Connell, was a Farmer in Polgorm? Polgourm? in the Middle of the 1800s.
This is all the information I have. Is this the right name and which county is this in?

Many Thanks.
Elizabeth O'Connell

Posted Sun 5 Feb 2017 4:28 PM
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Hello Elizabeth,

First of all welcome to the community, It's great to see that you are interested in finding out more about your Great Great Grandfather Daniel O'Connell.

The most helpful thing to know when searching for old Irish documents is how the records are stored. Before 1864 the only records kept were in the form of church and parish records (so usually baptismal records instead of birth certificates, and burial records instead of death certificates). Many of these have regrettably been lost over the years, however, all the surviving records have been sorted into county based genealogical centres. In 1864 civil registration was introduced in Ireland, which is when we started seeing the formal registration of births, marriages, adoptions and deaths. These records have been kept at the General Register Office of Ireland (GRO), to this day. Additionally, once Northern Ireland was created in 1921, we saw the creation of GRONI, the General Register Office of Northern Ireland. This is important, because anyone who lived in one of the 6 counties that would later become part of Northern Ireland between 1864 and 1921 would have had their records stored with GRO, but if they were born or lived in Northern Ireland after 1921, then their records would be with GRONI.

I have tried searching for the location of Polgorm or Polgourm and unfortunately haven't been able to find the town. This is where documentation plays a very important part of tracing your ancestors.

Maybe some of our fellow community members may have some more suggestions on the actual location.

Best of luck in your research,

Regards

Martin
Posted Sun 5 Feb 2017 10:30 PM
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Ireland
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Hi Elizabeth,

The key thing is to identify Pollgorm.

I searched the Irish placename site www.logainm.ie and found many placename phonetically spelt like this.
So its' possible that your ancestor was from Mayo, Galway or Donegal.

Did Daniel O'Connell remain in Ireland or did he immigrate to North America? If he lived, married and died here, then you will need to search through the parish registers, or land records to trace him in the Irish records. 
You can search the Catholic parish registers online at www.findmypast.com 
The parish registers are free to anyone that is registered on the website, so you can search at no cost.
The most complete version of land records (Griffith's Valuation & the Valuation Office records) is also on findmypast but behind a pay wall.

If you check out the logainm.ie website and draw up a list of parishes where the placename An Pollgorm/ Poulgorm/ Polgorm, you can then draw up a list of Catholic parishes that you can search across.
It will involve a little bit of searching on your part, but at no cost, and you can do it at home from your own laptop.

I hope this helps.

Good luck,

Fiona.

Posted Mon 6 Feb 2017 10:32 AM
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Ireland
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Oops, forget to mention. There's also Poulgorm which is phonetically similar, in counties Clare, Limerick and Kerry.
Posted Mon 6 Feb 2017 10:36 AM
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Derry~Londonderry
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Hi Elizabeth

Inconsistency in spelling of place names (and surnames) is well known to those who have conducted research into their Irish family history. Place names, originally in Gaelic, were anglicised from the 17th century, by settlers with little knowledge of the Irish language. This resulted in many different spellings of the same place name. An ‘official’ and standardised spelling of townland names for all Ireland was established, by 1842, by the Ordnance Survey and published in the Townland Index and on Ordnance Survey maps.
 
As you probably suspect there is no place recorded as Polgorm/Polgourm in the Townland Index. This, of course, doesn’t mean that it doesn’t exist; it could be a corruption/misspelling of a townland name that is currently ‘disguised’. It must also be pointed out that there are many place names in Ireland (some of which appear on maps and others that don’t) which are even more localised than a townland name.
 
If your family knowledge of Polgorm comes from an historical document it would be worth your while to get second opinions on the spelling/interpretation of the placename. Fiona confirms, for example, there are many ways of phonetically spelling a placename that sounds like Polgorm; for example as Fiona points out, Poulgorm which is the ‘official’ spelling of a townland of that name in parish of Kilcorney, County Clare.
 
If you have examined record sources in GB, without success, for any references to county and/or parish of origin of your Daniel O’Connell. I would recommend you search the following Irish online sources to see if you can match surname O’Connell to placenames that sound like Polgorm: 

Mid-19th century Griffiths Valuation at http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation 
  
Early 19th century tithe books at http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie  

Use Townland/Address search function on county databases on RootsIreland website at http://www.rootsireland.ie  to see if you can find any O’Connell entries (including variant spellings) that match to Polgorm/Polgourm/Poulgorm etc (you can also use wildcard facility of % to search for variant place name spellings).

Posted Mon 6 Feb 2017 11:19 AM
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Hello Elizabeth,
I'm a very distant relative in America.
Daniel O'Connell is suppose to be my great-great-great-great grandfather as well.
I've been doing research on my family history, but it doesn't seem to be adding-up as far as what has been passed down in my family.
My great-great-great grandmother was supposedly Elizabeth O'Connell-Kehoe.
But, from what I've read about his children, Elizabeth was not the daughter that married Thomas Kehoe, and came to America.
Could you shed some light on the family history?


Thank you,
Jane C.

Posted Sun 8 Dec 2019 4:11 PM
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Island of Ireland
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Hi Jane, 

It's wonderful to see there is a family connection here! :) I've hidden your email address because of privacy, but I hope you'll be able to get in touch with Elizabeth. 

Let me know if you have any questions! 
Posted Sun 8 Dec 2019 5:43 PM
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