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Dougherty Family in Donegal

Dougherty Family in Donegal

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My paternal ancestors, David & Polly Scoytt Dougherty, left Ireland around 1744 and ended up in New York. My research indicates they most likely hailed from the Inishowen Peninsula. Does anyone know where I could find their ship docket from Ireland? I plan to visit in September and hope to retrace some of the migration trail. I'd also love to meet any current relatives still living in Ireland. And I'm really sorry my crazy cousin burned down Derry 400 hundred years ago!

Posted Tue 9 Feb 2016 9:40 PM
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Hi Evelyn!
If you are interested to find our more information about your ancestors, I would recommend you to get in touch with Ireland Reaching Out and irishgenealogy.ie. The civil registration was not introduced in Ireland until 1864. Before 1864 records were kept in the form of baptismal, marriage and burial records at the local parish churches; any remaining records from this time have been collected in the Genealogical Centre assigned to their county. You could take a chance and contact the genealogical centre of County Donegal. As you are planning visit Ireland in September, it's recommended to make an appointment so you have all of the information necessary for your research while you’re here.

I wish you the best of luck on your search! :)
Posted Tue 9 Feb 2016 10:07 PM
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Derry~Londonderry
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Doherty family Tree traced back 46 generations!

Fergus Gillespie of the Office of the Chief Herald in Dublin, compiled for Derry Genealogy,   for the Irish Homecoming Festival in September 1992, a chart which, on the male line, recorded the ancestors of Ramon O’Dogherty, “Chief of the Name”, back through 46 generations to Niall of the Nine Hostages, King of Tara and High King of Ireland who was slain c. 450 AD. 
  
Ramon O’Dogherty (born 1919), resident in Cadiz, Spain, was recognised in 1990 in a ceremony held during the worldwide reunion of the Doherty/O'Doherty clan in Derry and Inishowen as ‘O Dochartaigh Inis Eoghain (O Dogherty of Inishowen), Chief of the Name’.
 
Ramon is a direct descendant of Sean O’Dogherty; brother of Sir Cathaoir, Lord of Inishowen (in Donegal), the last chief of the O’Dohertys prior to the Plantation of Ulster. Cathaoir was killed near Kilmacrenan, Donegal in war with the English in 1608.
 
The founder of the Spanish branch of the O’Doghertys was John who, on the death of his father Eoghan in 1784, came out with his brothers Henry and Clinton Dillon to pursue a career in the Spanish Navy, the most exclusive branch of the Spanish armed forces. Entry required them to show their genealogy, proving noble origin. In 1790 the King of Arms in Dublin Castle confirmed the three brothers as being “descended in a direct line from Shane or Sir John O’Dogherty, Chief of Innish-Owen”.
 
Many of the prominent surnames of Gaelic origin in Counties Derry, Donegal and Tyrone today trace their descent from Niall of the Nine Hostages, and, in particular, from two of his sons Eoghan and Conall Gulban.
 
Those tracing descent from Eoghan include: Brolly, Carlin, Devlin, Donnelly, Duddy, Duffy, Farren, Gormley, Hegarty, McCloskey, McLaughlin, Mellon, Mullen, O’Hagan, O’Kane, O’Neill, Quinn and Toner. From Conall Gulban: Doherty, Friel, Gallagher, McCafferty, McDaid, McDevitt and O’Donnell.
 
The Genealogical Office manuscript collections (GO Ms) in the Office of the Chief Herald at the National Library of Ireland, Dublin are the most important source for the genealogies of Gaelic families. To find out more about the Office of the Chief Herald and its manuscript collections select ‘Heraldry’ at www.nli.ie. Genealogical Office manuscripts can be accessed in the Manuscripts Reading Room in the National Library of Ireland.
 
For example, in the National Library of Ireland, Dublin at reference Ms. 27,711 (c) the following typescript signed by the author can be found, History of the O'Dogherty family of Inishowen and Spain by Ramón Salvador O'Dogherty Sanchez of Spain.

Brian Mitchell
Derry Genealogy

Posted Wed 16 Mar 2016 1:05 PM
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