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Londonderry

Londonderry

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Group: Community Member Last Active: Wed 4 Sep 2019 8:42 AM Visits: 0
I know this is from the North. But that is where my family came from in 1730. I truly don't want  to get into the 1915 side of the talk, I just want to check things out.  Being as that is where we Andrews came from originally, should I seek information from churches there? If so which? We were Methodist from all I know. If not where? I love the whole of this great green island, and Dingle is where my heart resides.

Posted Thu 11 Feb 2016 6:33 PM
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I appreciate your caution and respect for the subject matter Richard, but when it comes to genealogy we needn't be shy about history; it's a major part of the story after all. :)

That being said, you will find that there is a unique situation surrounding records from before and after the creation of Northern Ireland, which I am happy to explain. ;)

Civil registration, as we know it today, wasn't introduced in Ireland until 1864. So right off the bat, all records from before that time would have been church or parish records. While some of these have regrettably been lost over the years, all the remaining records have been sorted into county based genealogical centres, so this is the first place to turn to, in order to find documents and information for your ancestors, no matter what area of Ireland they lived in.

In 1864, civil registration was introduced, as I mentioned, and we seethe creation of the General Register Office of Ireland (GRO). All records, including but not limited to birth, marriage, adoption and death certificates, have been kept there ever since. Now, in 1921, when we saw the official creation of Northern Ireland, we also saw the creation of PRONI, the Public Records Office of Northern Ireland and this is where it gets interesting! The six counties of Northern Ireland were of course counted and treated like the rest of the island until 1921, so all the records for people born/living in those six counties before 1921 would have had their records stored at GRO, and only births, marriages and deaths from that year onward have been stored at PRONI.

In order to find the specific information about your family, I would recommend that you start by building a paper trail and then working your way back, until you know which of the above mentioned offices would be the most appropriate for you. The way to do this is by gathering as many documents as you can from your local registry office and archives, starting with your own birth certificate and then adding those of your parents, four grandparents, eight great-grandparents etc. until you come across your first ancestors who were not born in the same country as you, but rather, in Ireland. Once you know when and where in Ireland your first emigrating ancestors were born, you'll be able to select the best office. 

Good Luck with your search! :D
Posted Thu 11 Feb 2016 7:23 PM
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Derry~Londonderry
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'Londonderry’ as a place of origin can refer to the city, the county or port of departure. At the turn of the 19th century the catchment area of port of Londonderry for emigrants departing Ireland were Counties Londonderry, Donegal and Tyrone and to a lesser extent northwest Antrim and north Fermanagh. In theory, your ancestor could have originated in this wider area.


The port of Londonderry (also known as Derry) was the major emigration port for northwest Ireland from c. 1680 to 1939. A summary history of Derry as an emigration port can be found on the website of the Londonderry Port and Harbour Commissioners at http://www.londonderryport.com/derry.htm.
 
As births in Ireland were not subject to civil registration until 1864 it means you will have to rely on church baptismal registers to confirm 18th century birth details. Dates of commencement and quality of information in church registers vary from parish to parish and from denomination to denomination. Access to church registers, in the absence of indexes and databases, is generally gained through knowledge of an ancestor's parish address and religious denomination.
 
Although RootsIreland (www.rootsireland.ie) is the largest online source of Irish church register transcripts of all denominations, Roman Catholic and Protestant, in northwest Ireland (and in particular for Counties Derry and Donegal) it must be emphasised that a failure to find relevant birth/marriage entries in this database (or indeed any ‘big’ Irish family history database) doesn't mean that the events you are looking for didn't happen in Ireland. It simply means that they are not recorded in the database; for example, they may be recorded in a record source which doesn't survive for the time period of interest or in a source that has not been computerised.


Your problem, of course, is that it is very difficult to trace ancestors in Ireland through the 18th century and into the 17th century owing to patchy survival of record sources for this time period. The majority of Irish church registers don’t survive for 18th century. Although Derry Genealogy has computerised the baptismal, marriage and burial registers of 85 churches in County Derry at www.derry.rootsireland.ie (the earliest being St Columb’s Cathedral in Derry city, dating from 1642), only 8 of them have surviving registers prior to 1800. Hence the birth, marriage and death details of many of our 18th century ancestors have not survived in a written record source.

Brian Mitchell
Derry Genealogy
 
 

Posted Wed 16 Mar 2016 12:58 PM
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I am looking for Andrews in Ireland of the 19th century. Does your family have a Jeremiah born around 1805 in your family? I don't know where my family Andrews came from and unfortunately all I have is that a Jeremiah Andrews was born in Ireland 1805-06 and migrated to Liverpool in about 1829. Thanks!
Posted Sat 16 Apr 2016 3:47 AM
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