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Pronunciation - Location Names

Pronunciation - Location Names

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Great Britain
Posts: 1
Group: Community Member Last Active: Wed 19 Dec 2018 10:25 PM Visits: 4
Can someone help with correct pronunciation of these locations?

Slieve Donard
Mourne
Slievenaglogh
Crocknafeola


Thanks.

Posted Wed 19 Dec 2018 10:28 PM
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Island of Ireland
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Group: Community Moderator Last Active: 43 minutes ago Visits: 6.2K
Hello Dean, 

I'd be more than happy to help you with the pronunciation of these names. Are you by any chance planning a trip to these locations? :)

Google translate has a helpful option where you can click on the little speaker symbol to hear the word or sentence out loud. You can do this for Slieve Donard, Mourne, Slievemageoh and Crocknafeola to hear how the names are pronounced. 

I hope this was helpful, and please don't hesitate to reach out if you have any other questions! 

Warm regards,

Melin
Posted Thu 20 Dec 2018 10:23 AM
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Northern Ireland
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Group: Approved Community Member Last Active: Thu 12 Dec 2019 10:25 AM Visits: 1.6K
Hi Dean,
The first two are easy.
'Slieve' is pronounced the same as the sleeve of a coat or cardigan.
'Donard' is pronounced as it is written, with the stress on the first syllable 'Don'.   Donald as in Donald Duck has the stress on the first syllable too.

'Mourne' is pronounced like 'mourn' meaning to grieve.

The other names I could make an intelligent guess at, but I would rather a local person helped you out there.

Hope this helps.  
And I hope you will come and visit us in Northern Ireland.  Maybe even come further north to the stunning Causeway Coast and Glens area!!!  Why not check it out.  https://www.visitcausewaycoastandglens.com/

All the best!
Mary.

Posted Thu 20 Dec 2018 10:28 AM
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Ireland
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Group: Approved Community Member Last Active: Mon 2 Dec 2019 8:03 PM Visits: 789
Hi Dean
Now, I'm no expert, being from the west and it looks like these are all places in the North East, but this is how I would pronounce them if that's any use to you!  

Slieve Donard - Sleeve (of a jumper/sweater) Donard
Mourne - Mourn (grieve)
Slievenaglogh - Sleeve nah glock
Crocknafeola - Crock nah feeolah

Here's a couple of bonus ones for good measure - commonly mispronounced by visitors the Wild Atlantic Way (put more emphasis on the underlined part)
Tralee - Trah (NOT Tray) lee
Galway - Gawl (like shawl) way
Inis Oirr - Inish Ear (Eastern Island - closest of the Aran Islands to Doolin)
Burren - Brr (like cur, NOT Be- urr) en

Irish place names are a great conversation starter/stopper ;) The Burren is the name of a region in North Clare which is a huge limestone plateau - the size of about 27 American football pitches.  The name Burren comes from the Irish word "Boireann" which means "rocky place", which I think is very appropriate!



I hope this actually helps and doesnt confuse you even more... :P

Go n'éirí an bóthar leat - which literally means "may the road rise to meet you" but generally means "Good Luck" :)
All the best from Joan and the team at Garrihys Doolin2Aran Ferries

Posted Thu 20 Dec 2018 10:32 AM
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