Duty on personal items not left in Ireland.

Duty on personal items not left in Ireland.

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Posted Tue 9 Apr 2024 8:58 PM
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Group: Community Member Last Active: Wed 10 Apr 2024 6:13 AM Visits: 287
Hi there!

My partner and I are from the US and are visiting Ireland in a few weeks. I’ll be bringing a camera and a couple lenses that would put me over the monetary value allowance for duty-free. I read the duty information on Ireland’s official immigration site and it still doesn’t really clear this up for me: if I’ve owned this equipment for several years and can prove with a receipt with a serial number on it that it was purchased in the US, and I intend to bring it back with me as it’s my personal hobby camera, do I need to pay duty taxes on the gear or fill out a form exempting me from paying duty taxes in Ireland? The gear is worth about $4,000 USD so I’d really like to avoid paying duty on it.

Thank you!
Brian
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Posted Wed 10 Apr 2024 9:38 AM
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Hi Brian,

Thanks for joining us here and asking your question ahead of your time with us! 🛬

Customs and duties are a complicated subject, especially as you say these items are your personal property and you will be leaving with them at the end of your holiday with us. The Customs website has indeed information on your duty-free allowances and $4000 would be over the limit of €430. 📷

We would recommend going through the Red Channel and showing the officers the equipment with your receipts etc and see what they say. The customs website suggests that if you are in doubt whether your personal items are exempt that you go through this channel. There is a contacts page on their website and this may be a good place to ask for clarification too.

Have you an itinerary all sorted out for your time with us? 💚

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Posted Thu 9 May 2024 12:26 PM
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When traveling to Ireland with expensive camera equipment that exceeds the duty-free allowance, it's always best to be prepared and understand the regulations to avoid any surprises at customs. While I'm not a customs official and regulations can vary, I can offer some general advice. Typically, personal items such as cameras and lenses that are used for personal use and not for commercial purposes are often exempt from duty taxes, especially if you can provide proof of ownership, such as a receipt with serial numbers indicating that the items were purchased in the US. To be on the safe side, it's a good idea to have the original receipts for your camera equipment with you when you travel. If you're questioned at customs, you can present these receipts as evidence that the items are personal belongings that you owned before traveling to Ireland. Additionally, you may want to check with the Irish Revenue Commissioners or contact the customs department directly to inquire about any specific forms or procedures for declaring personal belongings at customs and ensuring that you're compliant with Irish regulations.


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